William Notman (1826-1891) emigrated from Scotland to Montreal, where he established his photography studio. The first Canadian photographer with an international reputation, Notman opened additional studios across Canada and the United States to cater to the public’s growing fascination with photography.

Photography during the mid-19th century was not a simple process. The typical tourist generally did not carry a camera and much of the Notman studio’s images were taken with the tourist’s needs in mind. Visitors would look through Notman’s picture books and chose views to buy individually mounted or perhaps made up into an album and have a portrait taken as well. A gift of his photographs delivered to Queen Victoria pleased her so much that she named him “Photographer to the Queen.”

He was highly regarded by his colleagues for his innovative photography, and held patents for some of the techniques he developed. His work won awards at exhibitions in Montreal, London, Paris, and in Australia.

–adapted from Wikipedia

This print is mounted to single-ply board, suggesting it was once part of a photographic album. Prints from this period were often collected by people around the world who would paste them into personal albums containing images and artefacts of people or places they knew, or were interested in. The image itself has faded slightly to an even yellow-brown colouration; however, the area on the lower left and right surrounding the title and negative information show rich brown tonality.

We recognize that the title of the photograph is no longer appropriate terminology; we transcribe it here for historical accuracy.

Print-ready documents:

WILLIAM NOTMAN STUDIOS

#1823 Squaw and Papoose, Yale, BC

1888

Price:  $1,500 USD  stutus dot

FFPurchaseButton

Albumen print

7 ¼ x 9 inch

Stephen Bulger Gallery

About this artwork…
Mounted to 7 ¾ x 9 ½ inch period paper

Titled, attributed, and numbered, on negative, printed as part of image

Image ref. 1823

Printed circa 1888

[ SBG-WN-0089-O ]

Unframed

William Notman (1826-1891) emigrated from Scotland to Montreal, where he established his photography studio. The first Canadian photographer with an international reputation, Notman opened additional studios across Canada and the United States to cater to the public’s growing fascination with photography.

Photography during the mid-19th century was not a simple process. The typical tourist generally did not carry a camera and much of the Notman studio’s images were taken with the tourist’s needs in mind. Visitors would look through Notman’s picture books and chose views to buy individually mounted or perhaps made up into an album and have a portrait taken as well. A gift of his photographs delivered to Queen Victoria pleased her so much that she named him “Photographer to the Queen.”

He was highly regarded by his colleagues for his innovative photography, and held patents for some of the techniques he developed. His work won awards at exhibitions in Montreal, London, Paris, and in Australia.

–adapted from Wikipedia

This print is mounted to single-ply board, suggesting it was once part of a photographic album. Prints from this period were often collected by people around the world who would paste them into personal albums containing images and artefacts of people or places they knew, or were interested in. The image itself has faded slightly to an even yellow-brown colouration; however, the area on the lower left and right surrounding the title and negative information show rich brown tonality.

We recognize that the title of the photograph is no longer appropriate terminology; we transcribe it here for historical accuracy.

Print-ready documents:

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