Larry Towell (b. Chatham, Ontario, 1953) is Canada’s first photographer to be associated with Magnum, the world’s most prestigious photo agency, which was founded by Henri Cartier-Bresson and Robert Capa in 1947.

In 1976, after completing a Visual Arts degree at York University in Toronto, Towell volunteered in Calcutta where he began photographing and writing. In 1984, he became a freelance photographer and writer. He completed projects on the Nicaraguan Contra war, on the relatives of the disappeared in Guatemala, and on American Vietnam War veterans who had returned to Vietnam to rebuild the country.

In 1996, Towell completed a project based on ten years of reportage in El Salvador, followed by a major book on the Palestinians. His fascination with landlessness also led him to the Mennonite migrant workers of Mexico, an eleven-year project completed in 2000. After receiving the inaugural Henri Cartier-Bresson Award, Towell finished a second highly acclaimed book on the Palestinian-Israeli conflict in 2005. 

His most recent project, The World from My Front Porch is a collection of photographs of his family’s life in southern Ontario. In this personal album, Towell begins with a personal story of his family and farm and concludes with the story of his journeys beyond his front porch.

Towell’s photo stories have been published in many international magazines including; LIFE, The New York Times Magazine, Esquire, Elle, Rolling Stone, GEO, and Stern. He has had numerous one person and group exhibitions across Europe, the U.S., and Canada, and is in many public and private collections internationally. 

Towell has won many international photo awards including the Henri Cartier-Bresson Award (first recipient); the World Press Photo of the Year; The Hasselblad Award; The Alfred Eisenstadt Award; The Oskar Barnack Award; and the first Roloff Beny Book award for his 1997 monograph entitled El Salvador, amongst others.  He is also a gifted writer and musician and is the author of three CDs as well as Indecisive Moments (2008), an award winning short film.

He currently sharecrops a 75-acre farm in rural Ontario where he lives with his wife and two of his four children.

The week after September 11th was, for many, a week spent glued to the TV searching for updates and answers about the terrorist attacks that took place in the eastern United States, but particularly the attack on the World Trade Center in New York City. Many recall that the Saturday morning papers from that week were especially bulkier than normal, with news and commentary trying to make sense of the multiple tragedies that occurred just days before.

Readers of Canada’s Globe and Mail newspaper saw this image as the cover to that paper’s FEATURE section, and reacted viscerally to this single frame of a man, amid the destruction, trying to make sense of a shard of paper found in the rubble. This poignant photograph is one of many to capture the chaos of that day in 2001, but it continues to strike a chord with viewers in how it encapsulates so much of how it must have felt to be an immediate witness to those events.

LARRY TOWELL

Man Reading Office Debris, Attack on World Trade Center

September 11, 2001

Price:  $2,200 USD  stutus dot

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Gelatin silver print

16 x 20 inch

Stephen Bulger Gallery

About this artwork…
Image size: 12 ¾ x 19 inch

Artist's stamp, in relief, au recto

Signed, titled, and dated, in pencil, au verso

Printed on 27/10/2001

[ SBG-LT-911-1-0003-C ]

Unframed

Image courtesy of Magnum Photos

Larry Towell (b. Chatham, Ontario, 1953) is Canada’s first photographer to be associated with Magnum, the world’s most prestigious photo agency, which was founded by Henri Cartier-Bresson and Robert Capa in 1947.

In 1976, after completing a Visual Arts degree at York University in Toronto, Towell volunteered in Calcutta where he began photographing and writing. In 1984, he became a freelance photographer and writer. He completed projects on the Nicaraguan Contra war, on the relatives of the disappeared in Guatemala, and on American Vietnam War veterans who had returned to Vietnam to rebuild the country.

In 1996, Towell completed a project based on ten years of reportage in El Salvador, followed by a major book on the Palestinians. His fascination with landlessness also led him to the Mennonite migrant workers of Mexico, an eleven-year project completed in 2000. After receiving the inaugural Henri Cartier-Bresson Award, Towell finished a second highly acclaimed book on the Palestinian-Israeli conflict in 2005. 

His most recent project, The World from My Front Porch is a collection of photographs of his family’s life in southern Ontario. In this personal album, Towell begins with a personal story of his family and farm and concludes with the story of his journeys beyond his front porch.

Towell’s photo stories have been published in many international magazines including; LIFE, The New York Times Magazine, Esquire, Elle, Rolling Stone, GEO, and Stern. He has had numerous one person and group exhibitions across Europe, the U.S., and Canada, and is in many public and private collections internationally. 

Towell has won many international photo awards including the Henri Cartier-Bresson Award (first recipient); the World Press Photo of the Year; The Hasselblad Award; The Alfred Eisenstadt Award; The Oskar Barnack Award; and the first Roloff Beny Book award for his 1997 monograph entitled El Salvador, amongst others.  He is also a gifted writer and musician and is the author of three CDs as well as Indecisive Moments (2008), an award winning short film.

He currently sharecrops a 75-acre farm in rural Ontario where he lives with his wife and two of his four children.

The week after September 11th was, for many, a week spent glued to the TV searching for updates and answers about the terrorist attacks that took place in the eastern United States, but particularly the attack on the World Trade Center in New York City. Many recall that the Saturday morning papers from that week were especially bulkier than normal, with news and commentary trying to make sense of the multiple tragedies that occurred just days before.

Readers of Canada’s Globe and Mail newspaper saw this image as the cover to that paper’s FEATURE section, and reacted viscerally to this single frame of a man, amid the destruction, trying to make sense of a shard of paper found in the rubble. This poignant photograph is one of many to capture the chaos of that day in 2001, but it continues to strike a chord with viewers in how it encapsulates so much of how it must have felt to be an immediate witness to those events.

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