Among the most influential figures of early photography, Alfred Stieglitz was a master photographer as well as being an accomplished printer of photogravures. He was a theorist and, as a gallerist, the founder of CAMERA WORK, a periodical that included important writings on photography and exquisitely made reproductions of photographs.

Link: Wikipedia.

Alfred Stieglitz was a major contributor to photography as an image-maker, gallery owner and publisher. Having mastered photogravure printing, he launched a new publication called Camera Work. This periodical promoted the art of photography through articles and images by leading makers of the day, whose works were often reproduced as hand-pulled photogravures that were tipped onto pages in the magazine.

Over the years, due to their high printing quality, these illustration plates have been removed from their original issues to be enjoyed as objects in their own right. This print, taken from Camera Work, Issue #3, shows jockeys and their horses experiencing quiet anticipation as they head off to the starting line. This is an eloquent image that romanticizes a day spent at the races, which at the time was a familiar part of upper-class life.

ALFRED STIEGLITZ

Going to the Start

1904

Price:  $5,000 USD  stutus dot

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Photogravure

8 ½ x 7 ½ inch

Stephen Bulger Gallery

About this artwork…
Printed on 11 x 8 inch Japanese paper

Mounted to 12 x 8 ¼ inch period board

Published in Camera Work, October 1905, 12:9

[ SBG-ASTI-0005-C ]

Unframed

Among the most influential figures of early photography, Alfred Stieglitz was a master photographer as well as being an accomplished printer of photogravures. He was a theorist and, as a gallerist, the founder of CAMERA WORK, a periodical that included important writings on photography and exquisitely made reproductions of photographs.

Link: Wikipedia.

Alfred Stieglitz was a major contributor to photography as an image-maker, gallery owner and publisher. Having mastered photogravure printing, he launched a new publication called Camera Work. This periodical promoted the art of photography through articles and images by leading makers of the day, whose works were often reproduced as hand-pulled photogravures that were tipped onto pages in the magazine.

Over the years, due to their high printing quality, these illustration plates have been removed from their original issues to be enjoyed as objects in their own right. This print, taken from Camera Work, Issue #3, shows jockeys and their horses experiencing quiet anticipation as they head off to the starting line. This is an eloquent image that romanticizes a day spent at the races, which at the time was a familiar part of upper-class life.

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